Liver transplantation: history, outcomes and perspectives

 | Post date: 2021/11/22 | 

A liver transplant is a surgical procedure that removes a liver that no longer functions properly (liver failure) and replaces it with a healthy liver from a deceased donor or a portion of a healthy liver from a living donor. Liver transplant is usually reserved as a treatment option for people who have significant complications due to end-stage chronic liver disease. Liver transplant may also be a treatment option in rare cases of sudden failure of a previously healthy liver.
In 1963, Starzl et al. performed the first liver transplantation. In the first five liver transplantations no patient survived more than 23 days. In 1967, stimulated by Calne who used antilymphocytic serum, Starzl began a successful series of liver transplantation. Until 1977, 200 liver transplantations were performed in the world. In that period, technical problems were overcome. Roy Calne, in 1979, used the first time cyclosporine in two patients who had undergone liver transplantation. In 1989, Starzl et al. reported a series of 1,179 consecutives patients who underwent liver transplantation and reported a survival rate between one and five years of 73% and 64%, respectively.  Liver Transplantation Program was initiated at Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein in 1990 and so far according to the American Liver Foundation, around 8,000 liver transplant surgeries are performed in the United States every year.
Read more




CAPTCHA

View: 47 Time(s)   |   Print: 8 Time(s)   |   Email: 0 Time(s)   |   0 Comment(s)


© 2021 CC BY-NC 4.0 | Modern Medical Laboratory Journal